Tag: generic epi-pen

Update to my “Generic Epi-Pen Post”

A few weeks ago I posted a full article that compared the generic “Adrenaclick Auto Injector” to the Mylan Epi-Pen.  I mentioned that our insurance company automatically filled this generic auto injector in lieu of the mainstream Epi-Pen as of January 1st, 2017 when all of the insurance companies changed their RX coverage plans for the new year.  I discussed in quite length the pros and cons, and noted that I did not have any confidence in this product because I have not had to use it.

As a follow up here is what I have found:

  • It took 6 weeks for me to receive the several “Trainer” pens I ordered online from the website I discussed.  To my dismay, the trainer pen when pushed into the thigh, does not make a “click” sound and the spring in the device does not budge at all.  It didn’t make me feel like this was the reality of how this pen would actually work if I was using this in an emergency situation.
  • I realized the actual auto injectors when dispensed, will not retract the needle once you remove the injector from the thigh after the medicine is administered.  I think this is dangerous and how does one dispose of this?
  • Although I’m not pleased with either of the two points I mentioned above, this pen was still a $0 co-pay and although not easy to use, I’m sure it would work well if need be.

Again, these thoughts are 100% my opinion.  After all of my research and actually trying to practice using this generic Adrenaclick trainer product, we have decided not to let our boys carry these pens.  Additionally, we have not taken them to our son’s school either.  I just don’t feel confident with this product.    This is because it’s so vastly different from Mylan’s Epi-Pen and Auvi-Q, and my concern is that a caregiver of school employee may not know how to properly use this product in an emergency situation, when time is of the essence.

Last week was my boy’s annual food allergy appointment at the University of Michigan where they have been receiving amazing food allergy treatment for the last 6 years!  Our doctor wrote new scripts for each boy and stated on the script “Generic for Mylan 0.3mg Epi-Pen.”  I then filled these scripts at the pharmacy and the cost was only $35.00 for 2 two packs!  The generic Mylan Epi-Pen is actually the same auto injector but significantly less in price.  In addition, I have used Auvi-Q’s Patient Affordability Program to order the new injectors for each of my boys!  This is paid for 100% by Auvi-Q and is a home delivery prescription service.  I can’t say enough wonderful things about this program!  We have always be a HUGE fan of Auvi-Q and we’re thrilled they are back on the market!  As a mother of 2 boys, the Auvi-Q’s are small enough to fit in their pant or jacket pockets.

At the end of the day, every family needs to do what is best for them specifically.  Personally, I don’t feel comfortable carrying a life-saving device that I’m not 120% confident with which is to be used as the first line of defense during an allergic reaction.  I encourage everyone to do their own research and make an educated decision.  The bottom line is that it’s wonderful that we, as food allergy families, now have more choices when it comes to epinephrine.

Have a great weekend!

~Erika

 

Generic vs. Milan’s Epi-Pen

A few days ago I picked up a refilled prescription for my oldest son of what I thought was going to be Mylan’s  Epi-Pen 0.3 mg twin auto injectors.  This is what we’ve been accustomed to using since the big recall happened with the Auvi-Q auto injectors fall of 2015.  Despite all of the controversy with Mylan, and the increase in pricing for the Epi-Pens, we have unfortunately had to stick to this prescription, as our insurance RX program never filled a generic option in the past.

To my surprise, when I arrived home and opened up the bag from the pharmacy, I receive 2 twin packs of the Authorized Generic form of the Adrenaclick, 4 auto injectors 0.3mg manufactured by Lineage Therapeutics.  This generic version was apparently introduced to the market back in June of 2013.  It boggles my mind why it was not available to me as an option until now???

At first, I was really UPSET because the pharmacy didn’t notify me that my prescription for Mylan’s Epi-Pen had been replaced by the Adrenaclick generic.  After a few minutes and once I cooled down, I realized it was exciting to finally see a “generic form of the life saving auto-injectors!”

My excitement quickly turned to ANGER again when I realized that the devices did not come with any type of training device!  What???  The box that contains the twin injectors has a spot for a trainer, but NO trainer was included in the box!  I was LIVED to say the least!

I quickly went to my laptop and typed in the manufacturer’s website which is http://www.epinephrineautoinject.com/contact_lineage.php.  The site contains a link which allows you to order ONLY 1 training pen at a time!  There is a 1-800 number you can call to order more than one training pen at a time.  Of course, I called it right away thinking about all of the people in our lives that we would need to train how to use these generic auto injectors- school staff, coaches, kid sitters, our boys of course, myself and my husband, friends, grandparents, aunts and uncles, etc…the list goes on and on.

After being on hold for approximately 5 minutes, a nice customer service lady answered my call, and when I told her that I would need to order at least 4-5 trainers, she mentioned they were backordered by 4-6 weeks!  She suggested I go to the website and individually order 1 trainer at a time.  This is what I did…I ordered 2 in my parents names, 1 in my name and 1 in my husband’s name, 1 in my sister’s name, and 1 in my brother-in-law’s name…WHAT A PAIN IN THE BUTT!  Needless to say, we’ll see when these trainers actually arrive!

So, all in all, it’s absolutely wonderful that my insurance RX program finally gave me a generic option!  It appears that consumers dealing with anaphylaxis do have more prescription options available now. Here are the PROS & CONS broken down for you:

PROS:

  • Price- my out of pocket expense for 1 pack of twin injectors was approximately $15.00 compared to hundreds for Mylan’s Epi-Pens
  • Size- generic packaging of auto-injector is approximately a 60% reduction in size compared to Mylan’s Epi-Pen.  Since we have 2 boys and they do not carry a purse, it will be easier for them to carry these in their pockets

CONS:

  • Trainers do not come with auto-injector prescription
  • Trainers must be ordered separately on manufacturer’s website
  • Only 1 trainer can be ordered online at a time, for more you must call customer service hotline
  • If you want more than 1 trainer, these orders are on back order for 4-6 weeks!  Unacceptable!
  • It took the pharmacy over 5 business days to fill the script…I’m assuming because Meijer does not keep this generic version on their shelves.  This was frustrating and thank god I had extras and didn’t need it immediately!
  • Trust- I don’t trust the generic as I have not had to use it yet
  • Quality- I do not know the quality of the generic
  • Learning Curve – it is cumbersome to re-train everyone in our life with new auto-injectors- cannot train them until trainers arrive
  • I have 4 new generic auto-injectors that cannot be used since we do not have the trainers…our boys will need to practice on trainers 1st before we feel comfortable with them carrying these devices

While there are currently more CONS than PROS at this juncture, I’m confident once we have an opportunity to familiarize ourselves with this generic, the PROS will begin to outweigh the CONS.

If you have any experience using these Lineage Generic devices I would love to hear your feedback!  Please contact me or leave feedback in the “comments” section of my post.

Once the trainers arrive in the mail I will update this post with feedback regarding re-training everyone/ease of use.

~Erika