Tag: allergic reaction

Generic vs. Milan’s Epi-Pen

A few days ago I picked up a refilled prescription for my oldest son of what I thought was going to be Mylan’s  Epi-Pen 0.3 mg twin auto injectors.  This is what we’ve been accustomed to using since the big recall happened with the Auvi-Q auto injectors fall of 2015.  Despite all of the controversy with Mylan, and the increase in pricing for the Epi-Pens, we have unfortunately had to stick to this prescription, as our insurance RX program never filled a generic option in the past.

To my surprise, when I arrived home and opened up the bag from the pharmacy, I receive 2 twin packs of the Authorized Generic form of the Adrenaclick, 4 auto injectors 0.3mg manufactured by Lineage Therapeutics.  This generic version was apparently introduced to the market back in June of 2013.  It boggles my mind why it was not available to me as an option until now???

At first, I was really UPSET because the pharmacy didn’t notify me that my prescription for Mylan’s Epi-Pen had been replaced by the Adrenaclick generic.  After a few minutes and once I cooled down, I realized it was exciting to finally see a “generic form of the life saving auto-injectors!”

My excitement quickly turned to ANGER again when I realized that the devices did not come with any type of training device!  What???  The box that contains the twin injectors has a spot for a trainer, but NO trainer was included in the box!  I was LIVED to say the least!

I quickly went to my laptop and typed in the manufacturer’s website which is http://www.epinephrineautoinject.com/contact_lineage.php.  The site contains a link which allows you to order ONLY 1 training pen at a time!  There is a 1-800 number you can call to order more than one training pen at a time.  Of course, I called it right away thinking about all of the people in our lives that we would need to train how to use these generic auto injectors- school staff, coaches, kid sitters, our boys of course, myself and my husband, friends, grandparents, aunts and uncles, etc…the list goes on and on.

After being on hold for approximately 5 minutes, a nice customer service lady answered my call, and when I told her that I would need to order at least 4-5 trainers, she mentioned they were backordered by 4-6 weeks!  She suggested I go to the website and individually order 1 trainer at a time.  This is what I did…I ordered 2 in my parents names, 1 in my name and 1 in my husband’s name, 1 in my sister’s name, and 1 in my brother-in-law’s name…WHAT A PAIN IN THE BUTT!  Needless to say, we’ll see when these trainers actually arrive!

So, all in all, it’s absolutely wonderful that my insurance RX program finally gave me a generic option!  It appears that consumers dealing with anaphylaxis do have more prescription options available now. Here are the PROS & CONS broken down for you:

PROS:

  • Price- my out of pocket expense for 1 pack of twin injectors was approximately $15.00 compared to hundreds for Mylan’s Epi-Pens
  • Size- generic packaging of auto-injector is approximately a 60% reduction in size compared to Mylan’s Epi-Pen.  Since we have 2 boys and they do not carry a purse, it will be easier for them to carry these in their pockets

CONS:

  • Trainers do not come with auto-injector prescription
  • Trainers must be ordered separately on manufacturer’s website
  • Only 1 trainer can be ordered online at a time, for more you must call customer service hotline
  • If you want more than 1 trainer, these orders are on back order for 4-6 weeks!  Unacceptable!
  • It took the pharmacy over 5 business days to fill the script…I’m assuming because Meijer does not keep this generic version on their shelves.  This was frustrating and thank god I had extras and didn’t need it immediately!
  • Trust- I don’t trust the generic as I have not had to use it yet
  • Quality- I do not know the quality of the generic
  • Learning Curve – it is cumbersome to re-train everyone in our life with new auto-injectors- cannot train them until trainers arrive
  • I have 4 new generic auto-injectors that cannot be used since we do not have the trainers…our boys will need to practice on trainers 1st before we feel comfortable with them carrying these devices

While there are currently more CONS than PROS at this juncture, I’m confident once we have an opportunity to familiarize ourselves with this generic, the PROS will begin to outweigh the CONS.

If you have any experience using these Lineage Generic devices I would love to hear your feedback!  Please contact me or leave feedback in the “comments” section of my post.

Once the trainers arrive in the mail I will update this post with feedback regarding re-training everyone/ease of use.

~Erika

 

The Little Things about Food Allergies Most People Don’t Even Realize

I was chatting with a few of my girlfriends yesterday over coffee about how our dog had recently been sick.  As unfortunate as it is, our two year old Wirehaired Pointing Griffon, Scout is a sock eater.  Yes!  He loves to eat our boy’s stinky socks when left on the floor!  No matter how often I remind the boys to put their dirty socks in the laundry bin, they still end up on their bedroom floor from time to time.  It’s been a challenge since Scout was a puppy.

Recently, Scout ingested something…we’re not sure what it was but he started acting peculiar last week and was not eating like normal.  I took Scout to the vet on Tuesday and thankfully after X-rays, he didn’t have an obstruction.  However, he did have lots of inflammation and irritation in his gut from whatever it was that he ate and then passed.

Long story short, our vet recommended we feed Scout canned dog food for the next couple of days since it’s more easily digestible.  The canned dog food at the vet’s office contained dairy and eggs so I had to take a pass.

I went to our local feed store and explained to the staff that I was looking for a canned dog food that didn’t contain dairy, eggs, or nuts.  We had about 3 people, including myself, reading every canned dog food label in the entire store.  Finally, we found a grain-free lamb dog food that was dairy, nut, and egg free.  To top it off, Scout loved it thank God!  And yes, Scout’s normal dried dog food is dairy, egg, nut and grain free too just in case you are wondering!  He’s on basically the same diet the rest of the family is on and he never complains!

My girlfriends couldn’t believe that I have to read the ingredient listings on the dog food labels.  Reason being, if Scout ate dog food that contained milk, eggs or nuts and then licked either of our boys it could mean TROUBLE!  Allergic reaction!  My friends said to me, “Challenges that you face on a daily basis with kids that have food allergies are not even on our radar, such as reading the ingredients on the dog food bag.”  For once, I felt like my friends actually understood what it was like to walk in my shoes.

This recent conversation with my closest friends struck a chord for me…my brain went into overdrive as I started thinking about all of the labels I have to read on a daily basis on all of the products in our home and when I’m grocery shopping.  For example, shampoo, dish soap, laundry detergent, body lotion, makeup, chapstick, sunscreen, prescription medications, hand soap, kleenex, deodorant, cleaning supplies, dog treats (most of which contain eggs, nuts, and dairy), etc.  The list goes on and on….now I have a HEADACHE!  These are not even food items mind you!

I guess the point I’m trying to make here is that parents of children of food allergies obviously have to be diligent with food labels.   That diligence extends beyond to so many more products that we come into contact with daily.  Most people would have a permanent headache if they had to continually check everything the way that we do.  I wouldn’t change it for the world…I’m just trying to help people gain awareness about the challenges parents of children with food allergies face encounter regularly.

I digress…Namaste and have a wonderful weekend

~Erika

 

Update on Food Allergic Reaction Yesterday

 

Many of my reader’s saw my post yesterday on my Facebook page about our son’s recent food allergic reaction.  This past Tuesday night I made a new vegan type of soba noodles for our family as a side dish.  The label read “vegan” and the only allergens on the ingredient label were “soy and wheat.”  Our youngest son Christopher ate his entire bowl of Soba noodles and 10 minutes after dinner he said to my husband and I that his stomach was really itchy.  My husband and I believe there were most likely trace amounts of eggs and/or dairy in the new product I had just cooked.  There is really no way to tell however and I’m researching 3rd party companies to test the ingredients of the noodles that were consumed.

We lifted up his shirt and he was LITERALLY covered in hives on his stomach and back.  I’ve never seen so many hives on a little guy!  What was strange about this reaction was that is was just topical hives.  In the past, when Christopher has accidentally been exposed to eggs or dairy he has unfortunately experienced more serious anaphylactic symptoms such as diarrhea, vomiting, itchy/scratchy throat, etc.  Not to discount all of these hives but as an asthmatic it was clear that he was not having any breathing difficulties and we treated immediately with 25mg of Benadryl.  We continued to monitor Christopher throughout the night, and although it took about 5 hours for the hives to dissipate, thankfully he was not showing any signs of anaphylactic shock.  In addition to the Benadryl every 6 hours I also had so Prednisone on hand and I gave him 10mL of that in addition to half of an adult dosage of Zantac which also acts as a histamine blocker.

After a long night, Wednesday morning arrived and Christopher seemed to be in the clear.  He was receiving dosages of Benadryl every 6 hours and I had consulted not only a nurse on staff at U of M where is treated specifically for food allergy, but also his local pediatrician.  At about 9am yesterday the hives started reappearing FULL force over the course of 2 hours and at that point we made the decision to drive him to the hospital.  I just want to stress that he was not showing any signs/symptoms of anaphylactic shock.  We decided to take him to the ER because we couldn’t get an appointment with his pediatrician until 4:15pm and we were concerned that the Benadryl was not property controlling the histamines.  We feared that the hives may eventually lead to additional symptoms such as pulmonary and other anaphylactic symptoms.  On the way to the hospital I spoke to my friend on the phone who was an ER doc and he suggested we administer the Epi-pen which we did prior to reaching the ER.

I believe the details of this experience are critical in helping others understand how to properly react during an allergic reaction, hence the long length of this blog post.  And again, this reaction was completely different from all others before.  Upon arriving at the ER we were taken back to a room almost right away given the nature of having administered Epi-Pen.  At the ER Christopher was given 50mg of Prednisone, 25 mg of Benadryl, and Zantac (1/2 adult dosage I think 10mg)…his vitals were good and he did not need an IV.  Christopher was an amazing trooper and a BRAVE little boy despite his discomfort.  After being in the ER for about 20 minutes his hives began swelling all over his face again (right eye started to swell up a bit), hives on back, chest, arms, buttocks, legs, etc. began to get worse.  After consult again with ER doc we decided to administer another Epi-Pen.  Our AMAZING nurse administered the Epinephrine through a syringe and Christopher said it “wasn’t as bad as the Epi-Pen.”  He was really in good spirits.

The 2nd dosage of Epi decreased the topical symptoms and swelling and we were discharged from the hospital after about 4 hours since his symptoms were under control and we live less than 2 miles from the hospital.  Needless to say, about 2 hours post-discharge hives began to appear again but not like before.  Our ER doc who was wonderful as well stated that we should expect the hives to come and go on and off for days…closely monitor him and continue prednisone, Benadryl and Zantac to taper drugs off for the next 3 days.

Last night was another long night as Christopher was covered in itchy red bumps, some of which were swollen, and others were just dots on his body and face.  Poor little guy.  Cortisone didn’t really help with the itchiness unfortunately.  We’re now on day three of the reaction and he’s in good spirits and I would imagine today will be more of the same…onset of hives followed by them coming and going as his body continues to flush out the histamines.

Anyhow, the last 2 days have been a whirlwind of emotions for us as parents and for both of our little boys.  Christopher has been such a brave little boy and so tough and strong!  I’m so impressed with his positive attitude through this entire ordeal and his eloquence during such a scary situation.

I’ll continue to post updates on my Facebook page as the days continue….I apologize for the rambling and any possible typos in this post as I rushed to get this post out in between caring for our little guy.   Additionally, I placed a complaint with the FDA regarding the product I fed the boys for the possibility of undeclared allergens…the verdict is still out on this until we receive the results of the chemical tests of the product.  I didn’t want to mention the name of the manufacturer of the product that I believe caused the allergic reaction until more facts are discovered relating to the ingredients.  Furthermore, I do want to state there is always the possibility that Christopher is allergic to another ingredient in the noodles that we have not been aware of.  Ie. perhaps he developed or has a new allergy that we do not know about…